Rescue Efforts

Wild Horse Education (WHE) engages rescue in many ways. We have provided individuals with information, and helped organize, several adoption efforts and rescue efforts. In 2013 the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) had limited removals of wild horses and burros from the range. This opened up some time for us to take in a few wild horses in need “hands on.” The following outlines some of our efforts.

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Boys from PVC on the first BLM Internet Adoption event of spring 2014.

Organization and Information

We provide adopters with information on captured wild horses in government facilities and information on policy and applications. An example of some of what we do can be found here: https://wildhorseeducation.org/2014/03/09/internet-adoption/

In many cases we are able to provide a complete “story,” such as the one published here about a colt we called “Jack.” http://wheblog.wordpress.com/2013/07/04/my-name-is-jack/

Trapsite adoption from Stone Cabin in bad weather in the middle of "nowhere" was a huge success

Trapsite adoption from Stone Cabin in bad weather in the middle of “nowhere” was a huge success

We assisted with the organization (and on the ground) with trapsite adoptions. One of which occurred at Stone Cabin. https://wildhorseeducation.org/2012/02/19/stone-cabin-home-range-adoption-event/ You can read about the roundup here: https://wildhorseeducation.org/roundups/roundups-2012/stone-cabin-2012/ Trapsite adoption is not for everyone but it provides an opportunity to adopt a young animal, straight from the range, where transport to a short term facility via semi truck and all the events at a short term holding facility, are minimized. In many ways this allows an adopter to see exactly where their wild horse comes from and limit stimulus. To date the trapsite adoptions have been very successful in placing wild horses into committed homes.

In events such as the McDermitt roundup, where horses were heading to slaughter auction, we found it necessary to file litigation and work on assisting with placement. As this effort progressed two very young fillies needed some “TLC” as rescues exhausted resources and the stress of roundup and slaughter auction created orphans.

McDermitt foal at the livestock Auction

McDermitt foal at the livestock Auction

Wild horses in the hands of WHE

 Faith and Dawn

Faith and Dawn. In the care of Wild Horse Education

Faith and Dawn. In the care of Wild Horse Education soon after arrival.

Faith learning how to walk in halter

Faith learning how to walk in halter. She is growing into a beautiful girl that loves to run!

Faith and Dawn, wild horse orphan girls. Two young fillies from the McDermitt roundup found themselves in need. Faith became orphaned. Dawn’s mother failed to thrive and was carrying another colt that further depleted what resources she had. So these two young fillies became ours. At first Faith appeared to be developing a respiratory issue. As many horses have a sensitivity to shavings we removed them and the issue disappeared. The girls are now handled daily and walk rather well in halter. They are picking up their feet and getting used to having them picked out and trimmed. Almost one year old now, they are calm and secure and loved very much. A fresh start after such a rough beginning in life.

Dawn at the Fallon livestock auction

Dawn at the Fallon livestock auction

Dawn and Faith saying "hello" to big baby girl Kidron

Dawn and Faith saying “hello” to big baby girl Kidron

Rosie and Kidron

Rosie and Kidron in holding at Sheldon during the only observation day allowed. WHE was the only observer present.

Rosie and Kidron in holding at Sheldon during the only observation day allowed. WHE was the only observer present.

Rosie and Kidron, the Sheldon Mustangs. Sheldon Mustangs, like the McDermitt horses, have little to no protection under law. The Sheldon often have found themselves in the slaughter pipeline. Sheldon was another area where we filed litigation as we worked to try to find placement options other than contractors that have sent Sheldon’s into harms way historically. We have kept litigation active to attempt to create accountable placement of the last of these great American War Horses.

Sheldon Roundup, taken 9/11/13

Sheldon Roundup, taken 9/11/13

"Rosie," a Sheldon mare removed from the range in 2013 back among the sagebrush of Nevada.

“Rosie”

 

Rosie, named for “Rosie the Riviter,” in keeping with all the hallmarks of her “American” heritage, was captured on 9/11. Heavily pregnant, she gave birth the following day. Giving birth in holding changed her “contractor” status. As Rosie is about ten years old she would have gone to Stan Palmer of J&S Associates. Instead she was now slated to go to Phyllis Strecker of Midland Texas who took the mare and foal pairs. As Rosie’s baby was so little Phyllis feared for her making the trip from Nevada to Texas. (You can view part of the roundup here: https://wildhorseeducation.org/2013/09/10/sheldon-roundup-begins/)

Rosie, and the baby that may have saved her from slaughter, Kidron

Rosie, and the baby that may have saved her from slaughter, Kidron. The wounds on Rosie’s face have healed. We hope to heal the unseen wounds too.

Rosie’s little filly we have named “Kidron,” in honor of General Pershings horse. Kidron has grown into a curious, beautiful and spirited, very tall young girl. She exemplifies everything one would expect in a soul that carries the equine military history of the United States in her blood.

Dawn and Kidron talking at the fence

Dawn and Kidron talking at the fence. Dawn is about 9 months old here. Kidron is only six months old in this picture. Big girl!

Rosie is an incredible lady. The young horses carry the spirit of youth with all of it’s curiosity and daring. Rosie carries the story of the wild in her eyes. As a ten year old mare one can only imagine the number of foals she gave birth to under a blanket of stars as her family survived all of the trials of the open range. You can watch her try to understand each situation that is so far from all she has ever known. She has not given up trying to understand us and we will never give up on her. She will eat from our hand now and every time she sees us she calls… and we call back. We know this is not your home Rosie, but you are appreciated for all you are.

Rosie and Kidron when they first came into our car

Rosie and Kidron when they first came into our care

Moving Forward

Wild Horse Education will continue to work with placement efforts for a variety of wild horses and burros in need. Our efforts are limited by our resources. We do have some space and would like to expand our ability to take in more wild horses (and burros). In this year of drought it is expected that hay prices will rise again. If we find ourselves with the available funds to buy appropriate panels and shelters and additional fencing and feed, we will expand. If you would like to help us expand or to care for the rescues we have already given a safe “landing” please visit: http://WildHorseEducation.org/donate to see the numerous ways you can help. Thank you.

One of the McDermitt horses at the slaughter auction. Rescue efforts are important.

One of the McDermitt horses at the slaughter auction. Rescue efforts are important.